Stormwater Management Plans

Current Consultations

In this section

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PUBLIC CONSULTATION IS OPEN now and will close 5pm, Friday 12th November 2021. Read the information on this page and have your say below!

COME AND SEE US AT OUR DROP-IN SESSIONS:

  1. Tuesday 26 October Timaru District Council Chambers - 12pm- 1pm
  2. Tuesday 26 October Timaru West End Hall - 6pm-7pm
  3. Wednesday 27th October Pleasant Point Town Hall - 6pm – 7pm
  4. Thursday 28th October Temuka Stadium Lounge - 6pm-7pm

Timaru District Council (TDC) and Te Rūnanga o Arowhenua are making plans to help manage stormwater discharges for the urban areas of Timaru, Washdyke, Pleasant Point and Temuka. Geraldine has already been completed in an earlier project. This webpage explains what stormwater is and why we need stormwater management plans. It also explains how stormwater is currently managed, and outlines key stormwater management issues that have been identified in each catchment area.

We are seeking your feedback on the issues we’ve identified, to help us understand their importance to the community and the impact on our waterways. Local knowledge will help us prepare our plans for improving the management of stormwater, and prioritise improvements/maintenance of the stormwater system in areas that will most benefit the community – we’ll be seeking public feedback on the plans at a later date.

Our vision

Together we value, protect and restore the mauri/lifeforce of the waterways so that it enables Mahinga kai, ki uta ki tai.

What is stormwater?

Stormwater is the rainwater that runs off hard surfaces - like roofs, driveways and roads. This then runs into drains, gutters, sumps and eventually enters streams, rivers and waterways. It shouldn’t be confused with wastewater or sewage from your home and business, which is collected and treated at a Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Stormwater

Why do we need stormwater management plans?

Stormwater Management Plans set out our approach for managing stormwater to improve the health and wellbeing of both waterways and our communities. In alignment with Te Mana o te Wai, these plans will help address the current stormwater issues and future proof the system as we continue to grow and respond to the impacts of climate change. There is also a legal requirement to manage stormwater – we need to comply with the Environment Canterbury’s Land and Water Regional Plan.

Our Stormwater Management Plans will take an adaptive management approach – meaning that stormwater management will be flexible and responsive to changing needs. This will allow prioritising of funds toward the highest impact improvement projects and operation activities.

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Our process to develop the plans

Timeline

Catchment areas

Click the boxes below to read more about the Pleasant Point, Washdyke, Timaru and Temuka catchment areas.

Timaru

Timaru catchment area

The below image outlines the catchment area for the Timaru Stormwater Management Plan.

Tim Catchment Area

How is stormwater currently managed in Timaru?

Stormwater is currently managed by:

  • Kerb and channel (this captures run off from roads including State Highway 1)
  • A network of pipes and open channels (these pipes are quite old and insufficient in some areas. Most of the stormwater that travels through the network is not treated before release before discharge into Saltwater-Otipua Creek, Waimataitai and Taitarakihi Creek
  • Ocean outfalls -(this is the final discharge point for much of Timaru’s stormwater)

What are the stormwater management issues for Timaru?

  • Issue 1 – Flooding - Parts of the urban area of Timaru suffer from nuisance flooding, particularly when it rains for an extended amount of time. This is due to limited drainage, blockage of natural flow paths and restrictions along waterways (e.g. culverts).
  • Issue 2 – Pollution - Polluted stormwater is contributing to reduced water quality and diminished ecosystems in our local streams and coastal waters and affects bathing water quality and food gathering – this impacts how Te Rūnanga o Arowhenua and the community interacts with these ecosystems
  • Issue 3 – Reduced Aquatic Life - Wildlife in the waterways is being reduced by both pollution and loss of natural habitat/shading - birds, fish, eels, plants and other native species are unable to thrive.
  • Issue 4 – Maintenance - The limited maintenance of the stormwater system and waterways is impacting their function and our ability to enjoy the waterways.
  • Issue 5 – Development - Our communities will continue to grow and as development intensifies, stormwater will increase. This puts greater pressure on the existing stormwater system and our environment.
  • Issue 6 – Climate Change - Our climate is changing and more extreme weather events and sea level rise will heighten existing issues with our stormwater system and the coastal discharges/outfalls.

More information/reports

Temuka

Temuka catchment area

The below image outlines the catchment area for the Temuka Stormwater Management Plan.

Temuka Catchment Area

How is stormwater currently managed in Temuka?

Stormwater is currently managed by:

  • Kerb and channel (this captures run off from roads including State Highway 1)
  • A small pipe network and open channel (these are quite old, and insufficient in some areas. Most of the stormwater that travels through this system is not treated before discharge to ground, Taumatakahu Stream and the Temuka River)
  • Soak pits (both Council and privately owned - these discharge stormwater to ground. There are groundwater bores/wells in proximity to some of these).

What are the Key stormwater management issues for Temuka?

  • Issue 1 – Flooding - Parts of the urban areas of Temuka suffer from nuisance flooding, particularly when it rains for an extended amount of time. This is due to limited drainage and blockage of natural flow paths.
  • Issue 2 – Pollution - Polluted stormwater is contributing to reduced water quality and diminished ecosystems in our local rivers, streams and other waterways – this impacts how Te Rūnanga o Arowhenua and the community interacts with these ecosystems
  • Issue 3 – Reduced Aquatic Life - Wildlife in the waterways is being reduced by both pollution and loss of natural habitat/shading - birds, fish, eels, plants and other native species are unable to thrive.
  • Issue 4 – Maintenance - The limited maintenance of the stormwater system and waterways is impacting their function and our ability to enjoy the waterways.
  • Issue 5 –Development - Our communities will continue to grow and as development intensifies, stormwater will increase. This puts greater pressure on the existing stormwater system and our environment.
  • Issue 6 – Climate Change - Our climate is changing and more extreme weather events will heighten existing issues with our stormwater system.

More information/reports

Washdyke

Washdyke catchment area

The below image outlines the catchment area for the Washdyke Stormwater Management Plan.

WD Catchment

How is stormwater currently managed in Washdyke?

Stormwater is currently managed by:

  • Kerb and channel (this captures run off from roads including State Highway 1)
  • A pipe network and open channels (these pipes are quite old, and insufficient in some areas. Most of the stormwater that travels through this system is not treated before discharge into the Washdyke creek, lagoon and groundwater)
  • Industrial sites typically provide some treatment of stormwater before discharge into network or they have their own resource consent for stormwater discharge to ground (soakage) or discharge to a waterway.

What are the stormwater management issues for the Washdyke?

  • Issue 1 – Flooding - Parts of the urban area suffer from nuisance flooding, particularly when it rains for an extended amount of time. This is due to runoff from the rural areas, blockage of natural flow paths and a sensitivity to water levels in Washdyke Creek and the Lagoon.
  • Issue 2 – Pollution - Polluted stormwater is contributing to reduced water quality and diminished ecosystems in our local waterways, drains and coastal waters – this impacts how Te Rūnanga o Arowhenua and the community interacts with Washdyke Creek, Waitarakao/ Washdyke Lagoon and the Mahinga Kai Waitarakao Mātaitai Reserve.
  • Issue 3 – Reduced Aquatic Life - Reduced Aquatic life – Wildlife in the waterways is being reduced by both pollution and loss of natural habitat/shading, largely attributed to both extensive industrial development in the catchment and coastal erosion. Birds, fish, eels, plants and other native species are unable to thrive. This impacts on the relationship of Te Rūnanga o Arowhenua with the culturally significant Mahinga Kai Waitarakao Mātaitai Reserve
  • Issue 4 – Maintenance - The limited maintenance of the stormwater system and waterways is impacting their function and our ability to enjoy the waterways.
  • Issue 5 –  Development - Our communities will continue to grow and as development intensifies, stormwater will increase. This puts greater pressure on the existing stormwater system and our environment.
  • Issue 6 – Climate Change - Our climate is changing and more extreme weather events and sea level rise will impact the ability to effectively drain the Washdyke catchment long-term.

More information/reports

Pleasant Point

Pleasant Point catchment area

The below image outlines the catchment area for the Pleasant Point Stormwater Management Plan.

PP

How is stormwater currently managed in Pleasant Point?

Stormwater is currently managed by:

  • Kerb and channel (this captures run off from roads including State Highway 1)
  • A small pipe network and open channel (these are quite old, and insufficient in some areas. Most of the stormwater that travels through this system is not treated before discharge to ground, Pleasant Point Stream and German Creek)
  • Swales (this captures run off from roads and filters some of the pollutants as it is conveyed to the waterways)
  • Soak pits (both Council and privately owned - these discharge stormwater to ground. There are groundwater bores/wells in proximity to some of these).

What are the stormwater management issues for the Pleasant Point?

  • Issue 1 – Flooding - Parts of the urban areas of Pleasant Point suffer from nuisance flooding, particularly when it rains for an extended amount of time. This is due to limited drainage and blockage of natural flow paths.
  • Issue 2 – Pollution - Polluted stormwater is contributing to reduced water quality in the streams, groundwater and diminished ecosystems. This impacts how Te Rūnanga o Arowhenua and the community interact with these ecosystems
  • Issue 3 – Reduced Aquatic Life - Wildlife in the waterways is being reduced by both pollution and loss of natural habitat. Pleasant Point Stream and German Creek are dry for much of the year and birds, fish, eels, plants and other aquatic life are not able to establish.
  • Issue 4 – Maintenance - The limited maintenance of the stormwater system and waterways is impacting their function and our ability to enjoy the waterways.
  • Issue 5 –Development - Our communities will continue to grow and as development intensifies, stormwater will increase. This puts greater pressure on the existing stormwater system and our environment.
  • Issue 6 – Climate Change - Our climate is changing and more extreme weather events will heighten existing issues with our stormwater system.

More information/reports

Have your say!

We are seeking your feedback on the issues we’ve identified, to help us understand their importance to the community and the impact on our local waterways. Local knowledge will help us prepare our plans for improving the management of stormwater, and prioritise improvements/maintenance of the stormwater system in areas that will most benefit the community.

Public consultation is open now until 5pm, Friday 12th November.

Here’s how you can provide feedback:

Make sure you read through the information on this page about your catchment area – Timaru, Washdyke, Temuka and Pleasant Point

Provide your feedback in one of the following ways:

  1. Complete our online survey
  2. Complete the survey published in the Courier on 21st October, cut it out and drop it off at one of the following locations:
    • Council offices at 2 king George Place, Timaru
    • Temuka Post Office
    • Four Square Supermarket, 93 Main Road, Pleasant Point
  3. Mail your feedback/survey form to: Stormwater Survey, FreePost Authority Number 95136, Timaru District Council PO Box 522 TIMARU 7940
  4. Email your feedback to stormwater@timdc.govt.nz
  5. Attend one of our drop in sessions:
  • Tuesday 26 October Timaru District Council Chambers - 12pm- 1pm
  • Tuesday 26 October Timaru West End Hall - 6pm-7pm
  • Wednesday 27th October Pleasant Point Town Hall - 6pm – 7pm
  • Thursday 28th October Temuka Stadium Lounge - 6pm-7pm

Submissions made to Council will be included in papers available to Council, media and the public. If requested, Council is legally required to make all written and electronic submissions available to the public, including the name and contact details of the submitter, subject to the provisions of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987. If you believe there are compelling reasons why your contact details or submissions should be kept confidential, please contact us.

Last updated: 21 Oct 2021