Stormwater Management Plans

Stormwater

In this section

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Timaru District Council (TDC) and Te Rūnanga o Arowhenua are making a plan to help manage stormwater discharges in Timaru, Washdyke, Pleasant Point and Temuka. Geraldine has already been completed in an earlier project. This webpage explains what stormwater is and why we need stormwater management plans. It also explains how stormwater is currently managed, and outlines key stormwater management issues that have been identified in each catchment area.

Our vision

Together we value, protect and restore the mauri/lifeforce of the waterways so that it enables Mahinga kai, ki uta ki tai.

What is stormwater?

Stormwater is the rainwater that runs off hard surfaces - like roofs, driveways and roads. This then runs into drains, gutters, sumps and eventually enters streams, rivers and waterways. It shouldn’t be confused with wastewater or sewage from your home and business, which is collected and treated before being discharged. Everything that goes down the drain ends up in our freshwater and coastal waterways.

Stormwater

Why do we need stormwater management plans?

Stormwater can impact all connected freshwater(streams/rivers, lakes/ponds, wetlands), groundwater and coastal ecosystems. Stormwater can also impact our lives and the things we love:

  • Human health - the ability to contact the waters and consume aquatic life
  • Ecosystem health - the ability for the environment to support life in all waterways
  • Aquatic life – the biodiversity, fish passage, and the health of plants and animals species that live in the waterways
  • Mahinga kai – the cultural use and the transmission of matauranga Maori
  • Recreation- swimming, fishing and gathering shellfish and other water activities we enjoy
  • Safety - stormwater can become a significant hazard and can cause damage to structures and properties

We need to make stormwater management plans (SMPs) to ensure that stormwater is managed in a manner that sustainably supports the environmental, social, cultural and economic well-being of the communities. And because:

  1. There is a legal requirement to manage stormwater
  2. The pressures from what we do on the land has put a strain on the health of our waterways and what lives in them.  This affects how we interact with the environment, which is part of the life of Te Rūnanga o Arowhenua and the wider community
  3. Our Stormwater infrastructure is ageing and insufficient in numerous places, causing flooding and contamination
  4. we have built in or blocked out places where stormwater would naturally flow and so it means we are more affected by flooding
  5. Growth and development in the townships requires careful stormwater planning and management to ensure level of service is provided
  6. Stormwater needs to be planned to withstand climate change impacts

Our Stormwater Management Plans will address each of these drivers, and take an adaptive management approach – meaning that our approach to managing stormwater will be flexible and responsive to changing needs, and that it will prioritise funds toward the highest impact improvement projects.

Our process to develop the plans

Timeline

Catchment areas

Click the boxes below to read more about the Pleasant Point, Washdyke, Timaru and Temuka catchment areas.

Temuka

How is stormwater currently managed in Temuka?

Stormwater is currently managed by:

  • A small pipe network and natural channels (the pipes are quite old and insufficient in certain areas. Most of the water that travels through this system is not treated before release into Temuka River, Taumatakahu Stream and groundwater)
  • Kerb and channel (this captures run off from roads)
  • Soak pits (both Council and privately owned - these discharge roof run off into the ground, instead of into waterways. There are drinking water wells in close proximity to many of these).

Temuka Catchment Area

Temuka Catchment Area

Washdyke

How is stormwater currently managed in Washdyke?

  • A pipe network and natural channels (the pipes are quite old and small in certain areas. Most of the water that travels through this system is not treated before release into the Washdyke lagoon and groundwater)
  • Kerb and channel (this captures run off from roads)
  • Soak pits (both Council and privately owned - these discharge roof run off into the ground, instead of into waterways.).

Washdyke Catchment Area

WD Catchment

Timaru

How is stormwater currently managed in Timaru?

  • A small pipe network and natural channels (the pipes are quite old, and insufficient in some areas. Most of the water that travels through this system is not treated before release into Saltwater Creek, Otipua Creek, Waimataitai and Taitarakihi
  • Ocean outfalls is the final discharge points for the stormwater runoff for Timaru
  • Kerb and channel (this captures run off from roads including Highway 1)
  • Soak pits (both Council and privately owned - these discharge roof run off into the ground, instead of into waterways)

Timaru Catchment Area

Tim Catchment Area

Pleasant Point

How is stormwater currently managed in Pleasant Point?

  • A small pipe network and open channels (the pipes are quite old and the network is insufficient in certain areas. Most of the water that travels through this system is not treated before release into Pleasant Point Stream and groundwater)
  • Kerb and channel (this captures run off from roads)
  • Soak pits (both Council and privately owned - these discharge roof run off into the ground, instead of into waterways.)

The main destination for stormwater in the pleasant point is the Opihi river via Pleasant Point Stream and the German Creek.

Pleasant Point Catchment Area

PP

Stormwater Management Plan Contact Information

If you would like to stay more updated with the project as it progresses please register your interest with our Stormwater Management Plan Update Service or if you have any questions about the Stormwater Management Plan project, please contact Stormwater Specialist Uki Dele at uki.dele@timdc.govt.nz or on 03 687 7446.

Last updated: 12 Oct 2021